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Humane Society Receives Better Business Bureau Award Local Nonprofit Was One of Three Nonprofits to Win The Award In the Entire State

May 22, 2013

Humane Society of Elkhart County BBB AwardBristol, IN. – The Humane Society of Elkhart County received a Better Business Bureau (BBB) Torch award for its strategic leadership and governance. The nonprofit was honored last week at a ceremony at the Grand Center in Fort Wayne where Humane Society director Anne Reel accepted the award. The Humane Society of Elkhart County was one of three nonprofits to be awarded in the entire state.

The Better Business Bureau Torch Award Program honors those businesses and nonprofits that “do it right” in the marketplace and setting ethics, honesty and integrity as the standard for the way they do business.  The recipients must meet certain criteria and they are selected by an independent committee separate from the BBB or its Board of Directors.

“This is a wonderful recognition of the dedication and work of the staff, board and volunteers to make this organization the best it can be,” said Anne Reel, Humane Society of Elkhart County. Reel has been the director for five years at the Humane Society and has made monumental changes at the shelter in conjunction with the board of directors.


According to the BBB panel, the Humane Society the judges were very impressed with the dedication and commitment to strategic changes made at Humane Society of Elkhart County. They also stated they were also impressed with the leadership and governance of the organization.

About the Humane Society of Elkhart County

Since 1939 the Humane Society of Elkhart County has been proud to serve our county with animal adoption and educational programs. The Humane Society of Elkhart County, an independent nonprofit, is on the front lines protecting the orphaned, unwanted and defenseless animals. For more information or how to get involved with the Humane Society of Elkhart County, please visit www.elkharthumanesociety.org

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Humane Society Hosts Annual Meeting

April 17, 2012

The Humane Society of Elkhart County will hold its annual meeting on Wednesday, May 23 at 6:00 p.m. at Essenhaus Inn & Conference Center located at 240 U.S. 20 in Middlebury.  Residents interested in advancing animal welfare on a local level or would like to learn more about the Humane Society of Elkhart County are encouraged to attend.

A focus at this year’s meeting with be on low cost spay and neuter and implications locally to the Michiana region. Dr. Kari Hatch of the Animal Birth Control (ABC) Clinic, the area’s only low cost spay and neuter clinic along with Pet Refugee’s Pam Comer will be on a panel to give an update on the clinic and its progress. In addition, guests can learn more about the Humane Society of Elkhart County with an awards program followed by the nonprofit’s business meeting.

“The Humane Society’s annual meeting is a time of reflection and celebration,” said Anne Reel, executive director, Humane Society of Elkhart County.  “We take an overview of our activities last year and give residents a glimpse of what is on the horizon for this year.”

Last year alone the Humane Society of Elkhart County touched the lives of over 11,000 animals with over half of those animals coming into the actual shelter.

Individuals who wish to attend may call the Humane Society at 574-848-4225 or RSVP online at http://www.elharthumaensociety.org and make reservations for a delicious dinner served family style which will cost $16.00. Guests are asked to please RSVP by May 18.  Those who wish to join as members of the Humane Society may also do so that evening. Membership is $25.00 for an individual for voting privileges at the annual meeting.

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We need Cat Food!

July 21, 2011

MEOW
ALL ABOUT: LOCAL HUMANE SOCIETY NEEDS CAT FOOD!

Bristol, Ind. –The Humane Society of Elkhart County is in need of DRY Purina cat and kitten food. In the past two months, the Humane Society has admitted more than 300 cats and kittens per month leaving their food storage warehouse down to one skid of cat food.

 

Due to this dire need, the Humane Society may have to halt its Pet Food Assistance program for cats until the current demand can be met.
The Pet Food Assistance program is available to only Elkhart county residents that need help feeding their pets due to financial hardships. There is an
immediate application process that can be done in person at the Humane Society.  Just in the past six months, the Pet Food Assistance program has helped more than 200 residents that have faced financial hardships. The Humane Society uses the program as a way to keep families together.

“Cats are the animals we deal with the most at the Humane Society,” says Rachel Dennis, assistant director of the Humane Society of Elkhart County.  “With these large amounts of intakes, we are facing challenges and want to stretch every dollar we have.”

All types of brands of cat food is accepted, however, the shelter is asking for Purina Dry Cat or Kitten Food to help keep a brand consistency at the shelter for the cat’s well being.

Cats make wonderful pets. To view cats that need a home, please visit www.elkharthumanesociety.org or stop by the Humane Society. The Humane Society is also continuing their adoption promotion of cat adoption prices being half off through the month of August (special adoption price of $40, regular $80). In addition, cats that are over the age of 5 years-old are $20 due to a 75% discount. Adoption fees from the Humane Society include initial vaccines and deworming, feline leukemia testing, microchip, grooming along with 30 day free pet insurance. As always, the Humane Society’s Companion Program allows one pet adoption at regular price and the other free. Application forms are available on the website, too.

Residents are asked to drop off items to the Humane Society of Elkhart County, 54687 CR 19, Bristol, IN 46507 from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. Or to donate money, visit the Pay Pal button at www.elkharthumanesociety.org.

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Hot Weather Tips from the ASPCA

June 8, 2011

We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but being overeager in hot weather can spell danger, warn ASPCA experts.

“Even the healthiest pets can suffer from dehydration, heat stroke and sunburn if overexposed to the heat,” says Dr. Lila Miller, ASPCA Vice President of Veterinary Outreach, “and heat stroke can be fatal if not treated promptly.”
Take these simple precautions, provided by ASPCA experts, to help prevent your pet from overheating. And if you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.

Visit the Vet
A visit to the veterinarian for a spring or early summer check-up is a must. Make sure your pets get tested for heartworm if they aren’t on year-round preventive medication. Do parasites bug your animal companions? Ask your doctor to recommend a safe flea and tick control program.

Made in the Shade
Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot.

Know the Warning Signs
According to Dr. Lila Miller, ASPCA Vice President of Veterinary Outreach, “symptoms of  overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. They can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees.” Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.

No Parking!
Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. “On a hot day, a parked car can become a furnace in no time-even with the windows open-which could lead to fatal heat stroke,” says Dr. Louise Murray, Director of Medicine at ASPCA Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital. Also, leaving pets unattended in cars in extreme weather is illegal in several states.

Make a Safe Splash
Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool-not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals that could cause stomach upset.

Screen Test
“During warmer months, the ASPCA sees an increase in injured animals as a result of High-Rise Syndrome, which occurs when pets-mostly cats-fall out of windows or doors and are seriously or fatally injured,” says Dr. Murray. “Pet owners need to know that this is completely preventable if they take simple precautions.” Keep all unscreened windows or doors in your home closed and make sure adjustable screens are tightly secured.

Summer Style
Giving your dog a lightweight summer haircut helps prevent overheating. Shave down to a one-inch length, never to the skin, so your dog still has some protection from the sun. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. As far as skin care, be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.

Street Smarts
When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum.

Avoid Chemicals
Commonly used flea and tick products, rodenticides (mouse and rat baits), and lawn and garden insecticides can be harmful to cats and dogs if ingested, so keep them out of reach. When walking your dog, steer clear of areas that you suspect have been sprayed with insecticides or other chemicals. Keep citronella candles, oil products and insect coils out of pets’ reach as well. Call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 if you suspect your animal has ingested a poisonous substance.

Party Animals
Taking Fido to a backyard barbeque or party? Remember that the food and drink offered to guests may be poisonous to pets. “Keep alcoholic beverages away from pets, as they can cause intoxication, depression and comas,” says Dr. Steven Hansen, ASPCA Senior Vice President of Animal Health Services. “Similarly, remember that the snacks enjoyed by your human friends should not be a treat for your pet; any change of diet, even for one meal, may give your dog or cat severe digestive ailments. Avoid raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate and products with the sweetener xylitol.”

Fireworks Aren’t Very Pet-riotic
Please leave pets at home when you head out to Fourth of July celebrations, and never use fireworks around pets. “Exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns or trauma to curious pets, and even unused fireworks can be hazardous,” says Dr. Hansen. “Many types of fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as potassium nitrate, copper, chlorates, arsenic and other heavy metals.”

Download the ASPCA’s PetWeather iPhone and Android App for Free
The ASPCA’s PetWeather App lets you know at a glance what kind of weather your furry friend can expect for your location, and will alert you if weather conditions make it uncomfortable or even dangerous for your pets to be outside.

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New Volunteer Opportunities

May 25, 2011

Are you 16 years of age or older and want to make a difference for animals?  The Humane Society has some new and exciting opportunities for you!

“Shelter animals need lots of opportunities for social enrichment,” stated Anne Reel, Executive Director.  She continued, “In order to help the animals learn some basic skills, we are developing new training opportunities and reaching out to our younger animal lovers to provide more hands to provide these enrichment experiences.”

The first segment will be focused on dogs and will feature a series of three trainings in order to be a part of the “Dog Power Team”.

On June 18th part one and two of this three series training will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at Joshica’s Planet Canine located at 4411 Wyland Dr. in Elkhart, IN and continuing at 1:00 p.m. at the Humane Society.  Individuals will learn basics of dog behavior, have some hands on practice at the Humane Society’s shelter and will receive a general orientation regarding the shelter.

Part three of the series will be held on two different evenings starting at 6:30 p.m. on June 28th and June 29th.  Participants will gather again at Planet Canine on June 28th for the first segment of “Camp Dog Power!” where basic command training and instruction will begin.  “Students will learn techniques to help teach shelter dogs some basic commands to increase the dog’s social skills,” Reel stated.  The second segment on June 29th will be held at the shelter and will provide hands on practice to implement what was learned.  Participants must participate in all of the three training dates in order to be a part of the Dog Power team.

For those interested in the feline category, the Cat Socialization Training will be held on June 11, at 1:00 p.m. at the Humane Society Shelter.  Those attending this training will learn about cat behavior and methods of  assessment.  Individuals will also need to attend a general orientation on June 18th at 2:30 p.m. at the shelter.  Again, both trainings must be attended in order to become a part of the Cat Power Team.

Rachel Dennis, Assistant Director stated, “We’re excited to try these new venture in order to increase dog, cat and human interaction and to see the potential to increase the dogs’ and cats’ social skills.”

Registrations are limited to 20 participants for either training.  You must be able to provide for your own transportation.  To register for the cat training, please call in your registration by June 9th.  To register for the dog training, please call in your registration by June 16th.  Humane Society of Elkhart County’s phone number is 574-848-4225.

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Annual Meeting 11′

May 5, 2011

The Humane Society of Elkhart County will hold its annual meeting on Tuesday, May 17 at 6:00 p.m. at Essenhaus Inn & Conference Center located at 240 U.S. 20 in Middlebury.  Residents interested in advancing animal welfare in not only our county but the state should not miss this annual event.

The evening will feature a discussion with statewide director Anne Sterling of the national Humane Society of U.S. In addition, guests can learn more about the Humane Society of Elkhart County with an awards program followed by the nonprofit’s business meeting.

“The Humane Society’s annual meeting is perfect for residents that want to get more involved with animal welfare in our county or just learn more about our organization,” said Anne Reel, executive director, Humane Society of Elkhart County.  “This meeting is the perfect time to talk about the exciting changes happening at the Humane Society.”

Last year alone the Humane Society touched the lives of over 12,000 animals with over half of those animals coming into the actual shelter. 

Individuals who wish to attend may call the Humane Society at 574-848-4225 or RSVP online at http://www.elharthumaensociety.org and make reservations for a delicious dinner served family style which will cost $15.00. Guests are asked to please RSVP by May 13.  Those who wish to join as members of the Humane Society may also do so that evening. Membership is $25.00 for an individual for voting privileges at the annual meeting.

To register, please visit www.elkharthumanesociety.org to register or call 574-848-4225 to RSVP.

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National Pet ID Week ~ Microchips $10!

April 20, 2011

There is no thought more frightening to a pet owner than losing a cherished family pet.  Besides standard ID collars, pet owners should consider microchipping should their pets get loose. The Humane Society of Elkhart County is raising awareness of this problem by participating in National Pet ID Week, starting April 18th

One of the best ways to ensure that a lost pet is returned home is to have your pet microchipped.   A microchip is a tiny computer chip, small enough to fit into a hypodermic needle, which is used to inject the chip underneath the skin of your pet.  The procedure is completely safe and is no more painful to your pet than a typical vaccination injection.

Each microchip comes programmed with a unique identification number.  This number is registered with a national tracking database system that can provide your name, address and telephone number. When receiving a lost pet, a shelter or veterinarian use a special hand-held scanner to detect and read the microchip. The identification number enables the owner to be found 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

Unlike a pet collar with ID tags, a microchip is permanent and will not fade or become separated from your pet.  As an added bonus, the chip is guaranteed to last for the entire lifetime of your pet, giving you piece of mind for as long as you own your pet.

“Losing a pet can be an extraordinarily difficult event”, said Anne Reel, Executive Director of the Humane Society of Elkhart County.  “For many people, a pet is like a member of the family.  We are always thrilled to be able to re-unite lost pets with their owners.  Having your pet microchipped goes a long way towards ensuring that a lost pet can be returned quickly and easily.”

As part of National Pet ID Week, the Humane Society of Elkhart County is offering microchip service for only $10, half off the regular price of $20.   This great price is available only for the week of April 18th; so call the Humane Society offices today at (574) 848-4225 to make an appointment for this invaluable service!  The office is open 9am to 6:30pm, Monday through Thursday, 9am to 5pm on Friday and 9am to 4pm Saturday. Due to the volume of potential interest, appointments are necessary and will be made starting after 12:00 noon.

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